Translating Protein (Un)Folding Mechanics into Bio-Applications

QUEST Center event
No
Speaker
Luai R. Khoury
Date
08/01/2019 - 14:00Add to Calendar 2019-01-08 14:00:00 2019-01-08 14:00:00 Translating Protein (Un)Folding Mechanics into Bio-Applications Globular-protein-based hydrogels that combine the advantages of (un)folding mechanics, wettability, and biocompatibility derived from their main building unit, folded proteins, have the potential to be a platform for studying protein mechanics and developing new “smart” biomaterials. However, a reliable method that can investigate the proteins (un)folding mechanics and characterize the mechanical properties of protein-based hydrogels is essential. In the first part of this talk, I will introduce a custom-made force-clamp rheometer that can measure the extension of an extremely low-volume protein-based hydrogel sample polymerized via photoactivated reaction, while clamping the force at a pre-defined setpoint. The second part will be allocated to how protein-polymer interaction and the physical folding code of a protein can be translated into engineering new biomaterials. Finally, I would like to discuss with you, would a science-kitchen fusion contribute to biomaterials science and make the culinary field to more interesting? Physics Auditorium, Room (302) Physics Building (202) המחלקה לפיזיקה physics.dept@mail.biu.ac.il Asia/Jerusalem public
Place
Physics Auditorium, Room (302) Physics Building (202)
Abstract

Globular-protein-based hydrogels that combine the advantages of (un)folding mechanics, wettability, and biocompatibility derived from their main building unit, folded proteins, have the potential to be a platform for studying protein mechanics and developing new “smart” biomaterials. However, a reliable method that can investigate the proteins (un)folding mechanics and characterize the mechanical properties of protein-based hydrogels is essential. In the first part of this talk, I will introduce a custom-made force-clamp rheometer that can measure the extension of an extremely low-volume protein-based hydrogel sample polymerized via photoactivated reaction, while clamping the force at a pre-defined setpoint. The second part will be allocated to how protein-polymer interaction and the physical folding code of a protein can be translated into engineering new biomaterials. Finally, I would like to discuss with you, would a science-kitchen fusion contribute to biomaterials science and make the culinary field to more interesting?

תאריך עדכון אחרון : 01/01/2019